Japanese teachers, delegates visit Lincoln

A+Japanese+teacher+visited+Lincoln+last+week+learning+from+students+while+also+teaching+them.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Japanese teachers, delegates visit Lincoln

A Japanese teacher visited Lincoln last week learning from students while also teaching them.

A Japanese teacher visited Lincoln last week learning from students while also teaching them.

Hailey Crook

A Japanese teacher visited Lincoln last week learning from students while also teaching them.

Hailey Crook

Hailey Crook

A Japanese teacher visited Lincoln last week learning from students while also teaching them.

Gabriel Porras, Editor-in-chief

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Last week, Lincoln High School was the site of international attention as a “cultural exchange” brough visitors from Shimizu, Japan over 5,000 miles away from town.  

The Lincoln High School Japanese Program hosted a teacher and a group of delegates from Shimizu, the City of Stockotn’s sister city, for a number of days.  

“He visited multiple classes in multiple areas of campus,” Said Japanese teacher Kathy Keeling.  The mission of the multi-day visit, according to Keeling was to “Transmit Japanese culture and also to learn about American culture and learn how schools work”.  The results of the cultural exchange, positive.  

“The people in [Shimizu] find Lincoln High School to be a very worthy high school,” Said Keeling, “He was impressed with the diversity in our schools and how all people are getting along.”

The sister cities program between Stockton and Shimizu started 60 years ago.  Shimizu hosts a population of nearly  32,205  and mainly grows mandarin oranges, green tea, commercial fishing and roses.  

The week-long visit also included visits to various Lincoln activities.  

“In Japan, they do not have carnivals.  He attended ours and was thoroughly amazed and thoroughly enjoyed it.” Said Keeling.

Through the sisters cities program, a Stockton area teacher is also slated to visit the Japanese town in the future.  The program also includes student exchanges during the summer

“I hope that we can continue these kinds of exchanges in the time to come,” Said Keeling, “ Students and staff seemed to enjoy [the delegates].  The visiting teacher was quite an interesting character and a unique man”