The Student News Site of Lincoln High School

The Lincolnian

The Student News Site of Lincoln High School

The Lincolnian

The Student News Site of Lincoln High School

The Lincolnian

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LHS Teachers Retiring
LHS Teachers Retiring
Michelle BekhtelMay 24, 2024

STOCKTON- The 2024 school year is coming to an end, and with this short time left we must take time to recognize teachers that have chosen to...

Did You See the Northern Lights?

Stocktonians were able to witness an intense geomagnetic storm, largest in years. 
Did+You+See+the+Northern+Lights%3F

STOCKTON Last weekend featured a once-in-a-lifetime G4 geomagnetic storm, the largest seen in decades. The resulting effect was a beautiful showcase of the aurora borealis (also known as the northern lights) that could be seen all across the Northern Hemisphere, including Northern California.

Individuals from northern regions of the state were able to enjoy striking views of the natural phenomenon, with green and purple hues visible around the hours of 10pm to 2am with a phone camera or a strong pair of eyes. The aurora borealis was most visible Friday evening, though people were still able to witness it on Saturday and Sunday. 

For those in Stockton, the event posed a unique opportunity for locals to bear witness to such an event, as generally auroras are observed at much higher latitudes on the globe.

So what are auroras?

Auroras are a natural phenomena caused by solar wind emitted from the sun interacting with the Earth’s magnetic field. Although they typically occur near the poles, they can occasionally be visible in a wider range of latitudes. They typically occur in various shades of purple, green, and pink.

 

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About the Contributors
Simon Kogure-Takama
Simon Kogure-Takama, Staff Writer
Simon Kogure-Takama is a first-year journalist and member of the social media committee for the Lincolnian. Invested in his work and research, he has written many papers before joining the Lincolnian. Currently in his senior year of high school, Simon hopes to work in astrophysics research in the future.
Matthew Spizzirri Uyeda, Staff Writer

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